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Kurashiki’s Storehouse of Photos

Kurashiki’s Storehouse of Photos

The name “Kurashiki” means “storehouse village,” and during the 17 century Kurashiki became a prosperous market where rice, cotton, and sake were collected from the surrounding area and shipped off to other parts of Japan. The warehouses of Kurashiki are still there, and this architecture gives this town its special appeal. Full of traditional Japanese-style buildings and canals, Kurashiki is one of the most picturesque towns in Japan and a great place to take some wonderful photos. We arrived there in the pouring rain, however, after spending the night at a wonderful five-room ryokan right on the main canal, we awoke to a splendid day for exploring and photographing the fabulous fall colors.    In addition to all the charming sights, however, right before we left we came upon a Japanese wedding.  The Japanese are very big on having very special weddings and they range widely from elaborate dress-up affairs in high end hotels all the way to staged photos in picturesque settings.  I don’t think they could have gotten more picturesque than Kurashiki in the fall, so we got the special treat of being able to join the hordes of tourists and the professional photographer in documenting this couples...
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Many Views of Mt. Fuji – Cellographing

Many Views of Mt. Fuji – Cellographing

Japan is a photographer’s dream destination and sometimes you’re lucky. The picture of Mt. Fuji on this blog header, taken from the shores of Lake Ashi on a perfect fall afternoon is an example of the serendipity of nature.   I always tell people to not expect to see Mt. Fuji when traveling to Japan, but, instead, to hope to be delightfully surprised if it shows up.   As a result, when I traveled to Hakone recently I had no expectations of seeing Mt. Fuji.  So it was pretty funny when it showed up outside the window on our train – I was too busy taking pictures of something else and when I turned, there is was, looming directly outside.  Wow!  It’s REALLY big from the shinkansen. Then, the next day, we did the Hakone circuit, including the cable car, ropeway, pirate ship and bus ride back up to Gora (more on THAT later).  That’s when I took the more non-traditional “view” of Mt. Fuji – a cablecar full of Japanese women on a day trip who were frantically taking pictures of the famous mountain with their cell...